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Grosset & Dunlap. Primarily a reprint house, but some notable first editions have been published by Grosset & Dunlap: King Kong (photoplay); Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys series; Fran Striker's "Lone Ranger" series; and Zane Grey's The Redheaded Outfield and Other Stories. In addition, Grosset & Dunlap's "photoplay" editions (illustrated with stills from motion pictures) are collectible. In our experience, there is no statement of edition or printing on Grossett & Dunlap publications. It is, however, possible to eliminate obvious later printings by checking the list of other books published in the series. A later printing would probably list titles that were published after the book in hand. (Note: For those authors whose first editions have become very high-priced, Grosset & Dunlap reprints in dust jackets closely matching the first edition's are sometimes desirable.)
Grove Press. First editions and subsequent printings are always noted on the copyright page; currently uses a number row. Later-printing dustwrappers are identifiable by small letter code on the rear panel (e.g., "ii" designates a second printing dustwrapper).
Robert Hale. Prior to 1958, either no statement on first editions or stated "First published (Year)," but in both cases subsequent printings were noted. Beginning in 1958, stated "First published in Great Britain in (Year)" on first editions; continued to identify subsequent printings. According to the publisher, a number row was adopted in 1994 for nonfiction titles only.
Hamish Hamilton. States "First published (Year)" or "First published in Great Britain in (Year)" on copyright page; notes subsequent printings. Added a number row in 1988.
Harcourt, Brace & Co. (1921-1960.) From 1921 to 1931 did not state on first printings. In about 1931 it started putting "First Edition" or First American Edition" on the copyright page. In many instances, it did not state later printings but took the first-edition statement off after the first printing. Occasionally, through the 1940s, it would use a "1" on the first printing. The "1" was removed for later printings.
Harcourt, Brace & Howe. (1919-1921.) Usually placed the number "1" on the copyright page of first printings, "2" on second printings, etc. May have occasionally stated "Published (Month) (Year)" on the copyright page of first printings and noted later printings.
Harcourt, Brace & World. (1960-1970.) States "first edition" or "first American edition" on the copyright page. Succeeded by Harcourt Brace Jovanovich in 1970.
Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. (Established in 1970.) States "first edition" or "first American edition" on the copyright page, or, placed "First Edition/ABCDE" on the copyright page of first editions except during the years 1973 to 1983, when they did not use the "A" but used "First Edition/BCDE." In both cases they dropped "First Edition" and the appropriate letter(s) on later printings.
Harper & Brothers. Prior to 1912, the date on the title page should match the last date on the copyright page. Began stating "First Edition" on the copyright page in 1922. A letter code for the month and year the book was printed, which would actually be earlier than the official publication date, was introduced in 1912. In most cases for first editions published between 1912 and 1922, the letter code for the year on the copyright page should match (or precede) the date on the title page.



Months
(the letter "J" was not used)
A=January D=April G=July K=October
B=February E=May H=August L=November
C=March F=June I=September M=December


Years
(the letter "J" was not used)
M=1912 B=1927 R=1942 G=1957
N=1913 C=1928 S=1943 H=1958
O=1914 D=1929 T=1944 I=1959
P=1915 E=1930 U=1945 K=1960
Q=1916 F=1931 V=1946 L=1961
R=1917 G=1932 W=1947 M=1962
S=1918 H=1933 X=1948 N=1963
T=1919 I=1934 Y=1949 O=1964
U=1920 K=1935 Z=1950 P=1965
V=1921 L=1936 A=1951 Q=1966
W=1922 M=1937 B=1952 R=1967
X=1923 N=1938 C=1953 S=1968
Y=1924 O=1939 D=1954  
Z=1925 P=1940 E=1955  
A=1926 Q=1941 F=1956  

HarperCollins. [Harper & Row changed its name to HarperCollins in 1990].States "First Edition" and uses a number row which indicates the year of publication and printing (may sometimes fail to remove the "First Edition" statement from later printings).
Harper & Row. States "First Edition" on the copyright page (also see month and date code above). In 1969, added a number row to the bottom of the last page (directly before the rear free endpaper) but often failed to remove the "First Edition" statement from later printings. By 1975, the number row was usually placed on the copyright page (still often failed to remove "First Edition" statement from later printings).
Hart-Davis, MacGibbon Limited. States "Published... (Year)" on first editions; subsequent printings are noted.
Rupert Hart-Davis. Although usually stated "First published (Year)" on copyright page of first editions, sometimes placed the publication date on the title page of first editions (with no statement on the copyright page); in both cases, subsequent printings were noted.
Harvard University Press. Places the year of publication on the title page of first editions, removing it from subsequent printings and adding a notice to the copyright page. In addition, may have used a number row in the 1980s.
W. Heinemann, Ltd. / William Heinemann, Ltd. / William Heinemann. From 1890 to 1921, placed the year of publication on the title page of first editions, removing it from subsequent printings and adding a notice to the copyright page (very occasionally, books reprinted in the year of initial publication may not have a notice on the copyright page). In the 1920s, began stating "First published (Year)" or "First published in Great Britain (Year)" on copyright page of first editions; continued to note subsequent printings.
Heritage Press. Publishes reprints or "trade editions" of the Limited Editions Club.
Hodder & Stoughton Ltd. Prior to the 1940s, had no consistent practice for identifying first editions or later printings. In the 1940s, may have begun to state "First Printed (Year)" on first editions and to note subsequent printings. By 1976, were consistent in stating "First published in (Year)" on first editions and noting subsequent printings.
Hogarth Press. No statement on first editions; subsequent printings are identified on the title page and/or copyright page. Currently use a number row.
Henry Holt. Prior to 1945, first editions can generally be identified by the lack of a later printing statement on the copyright page. Beginning in 1945, usually placed a first-edition statement on the copyright page of books produced in the United States (no statement on books produced outside the United States). After 1985, began using a first-edition statement and number row.
Holt, Rinehart & Winston. Prior to the 1970s, may have used a first-edition statement (with the exception of books produced outside the United States). Presumably in the 1970s began using a first-edition statement and number row.
Houghton, Mifflin. Almost invariably places the date, in Arabic numerals, on the title page of first printings, removing it on subsequent printings. Additionally, in the late 1950s, began consistently placing a "first printing" statement on the copyright page. In the early 1970s, replaced the "first printing" statement with a number row, which includes a manufacturer code.
B. W. Huebsch. No statement on first editions; subsequent printings noted.
Hurst. Reprint publisher.
Hutchinson & Co. States "First published (Year)" or "First published in Great Britain (Year)" on copyright page of first editions. (May be no statement on books published early in this century).
Michael Joseph Ltd. Since at least the mid-1930s, have stated "First published ... (Month, Year)" on copyright page of first editions, and noted subsequent printings. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, a number row was added to the printing statement.
Alfred A. Knopf. Until 1933-1934, sometimes stated "Published (Month or Year)" on the copyright page of first editions; later printings were noted. Since 1933-1934 have consistently stated "First Edition" (with the possible exception of children's books). Books with "First and second printings before publication" on the copyright page are second printings (e.g., booksellers' demand warranted a second printing prior to the publication date).
John Lane. Prior to 1925, no statement on first editions, but subsequent printings were noted. Since 1925, have stated "First Published in (Year, or Month and Year)" on first editions and continued to note subsequent printings.
Limited Editions Club. Does not reprint titles (see Heritage Press for "trade" editions), and always includes a colophon at the back of each book. In general, limited to 1,500 copies; issued in fine bindings and slipcases or boxes. Nearly all the titles are signed by the illustrator, and occasionally by the author or others.
J. B. Lippincott. Beginning in roughly 1925, sometimes placed a first-edition statement on the copyright page but always indicated later printings (or "impressions"). In the mid-1970s, added a number row to the first-edition statement.
Lippincott and Crowell. States "First Edition" and uses a number row.
Little, Brown. Prior to the early 1930s, no statement on first editions, but subsequent printings noted. In the 1930s, stated "Published (Month) (Year)" on the copyright page of first editions; later printings were normally indicated. Since 1940, have stated "First Edition" or "First Printing," and added a number row in the late 1970s.
Horace Liveright, Inc. / Liveright Publishing Corp. Prior to the 1970s, in general, no statement on first editions, but subsequent printings noted (may have occasionally used a first-edition statement). In recent years, may have used a number row in addition to stating "First Edition."
John Long. No statement on first editions, but subsequent printings noted.
Longmans, Green Co. (U.K.) Prior to the late 1920s, no statement on the first edition, but subsequent printings noted. Since the late 1920s, have stated "First Published (Year)" on the copyright page of first editions; subsequent printings are noted.
Longmans, Green Co. (U.S.) Prior to the late 1920s, no statement on the first edition; subsequent printings are presumably noted or carry a date on the copyright page later than the date on the title page. Since the late 1920s, have stated "First Edition" on the copyright page and noted subsequent printings.
The Macaulay Co. No statement on first editions; subsequent printings generally noted.
The Macmillan Co. / Macmillan Publishing Co., Inc. (U.K.) Prior to the mid-1920s, no statement on the first edition, but subsequent printings noted. Since the mid-1920s, have stated "First Published (Year)" on the copyright page of first editions.
The Macmillan Co. / Macmillan Publishing Co., Inc. (U.S.) Prior to the late 1800s, the date on the title page should match the last date on the copyright page for first editions (did not always designate later printings, but did change the date on the copyright page). Also, beginning sometime in the late 1800s, usually placed the statement "Set up and electrotyped. Published (Month, Year)" on first editions, and generally indicated subsequent printings. Mid-year 1936, began stating "First printing" on the copyright page; added a number row in the 1970s.
Macmillan of Canada. Does not designate first editions.
Robert M. McBride. Stated "First Published (Month, Year)," "Published (Month, Year)" or more recently "First Edition" on the copyright page of first editions; subsequent printings were noted.
McClure, Phillips. Either no statement or "Published (Month, Year, occasionally followed by a letter code)" on the copyright page of the first edition; subsequent printings presumably noted with either a statement or a later date.
A. C. McClurg. Stated "Published in (Year)" on the first edition, but may have failed to change this notice on later printings.
McDowell, Obolensky. No statement on the first edition or sometimes stated "First printing"; subsequent printings would presumably be noted.
McGraw-Hill. Until 1956, may not have used a first-edition statement. Since 1956, have used a first-edition statement and noted subsequent printings.
Methuen & Co. Since 1905, have stated "First published in (Year)" or "First published in Great Britain (Year)" on the copyright page of first editions, and noted subsequent printings. Prior to 1905, no statement on first editions, but subsequent printings noted (sometimes with a "thousands" statement on the title page such as "43rd Thousand").
Metropolitan Books. No statement on the first edition; subsequent printings presumably noted.
Modern Library. Reprint series published by Random House (prior to 1925 published by Boni & Liveright). Early titles in the series, especially in dust jacket, "Modern Library Giants," and titles with new forewords by the author or original publisher are collectible. Since 1925, have stated "First Modern Library Edition" on the copyright page of the first edition (only haphazardly prior to 1925); occasionally left the first-edition statement on subsequent printings, but the presence of later-published titles within the book in hand will often identify it as a later edition. Note: Later-issue dust jackets are often found on the first editions.
William Morrow. Prior to 1973, only sometimes placed "First Printing (Month, Year)" on the copyright page but always indicated later printings. Since 1973, have used a number row and sometimes a first-edition statement (occasionally fail to remove first-edition statement from later printings).
Museum of Modern Art. No statement on first editions, but subsequent printings are noted.
Mycroft & Moran. See Arkham House.
New American Library. Uses a first-edition statement and number row.
New Directions. Not consistent in using a first-edition statement or identifying subsequent printings, and often bound up first-edition sheets later, so binding variations are important in first-edition identification.
New English Library. States "First published by New English Library in (Year)" or "First published in Great Britain (Year)" on the copyright page of first editions. In general, the year in the "first published" notice should match the copyright year.
George Newnes. No statement on first editions.
W. W. Norton. In past years, usually used a first-edition statement, but did not indicate later printings. Currently uses a first-edition statement and number row, but occasionally fails to remove the first-edition statement from subsequent printings.
Peter Owen. States "First published by Peter Owen (Year)" on the copyright page of first editions and notes subsequent printings.
Oxford University Press. (New York and U. K.) Until the late 1980s, no statement on first editions, but subsequent printings noted. Started using a number row in the late 1980s.
Pantheon Books, Inc. Until 1964, no statement on first editions, but subsequent printings noted (may have occasionally stated "First Printing"). Since 1964, have stated "First Edition." May have begun using a number row, in addition to the first-edition statement, in the late 1980s.
Payson & Clarke. No statement on first editions, but subsequent printings noted.
G. P. Putnam's Sons. Prior to 1985, no statement on first editions, but subsequent printings noted. Since 1985, have used a number row.
Random House. States "First Edition" on the first printing; does not indicate subsequent printings. In recent years, added a number row beginning or ending with "2," i.e., "First Edition/23456789," to first editions, and removed the first edition statement from subsequent printings (e.g., "23456789" without a first edition statement would indicate a second printing).
Rapp & Whiting. Generally stated "First published (Year)" on the copyright page of the first edition.
Reynal & Hitchcock. Until 1947, no statement on first editions, but subsequent printings noted. For books published after 1947, see Harcourt, Brace & Co.
Grant Richards. No statement on the first edition.
Rinehart & Co. Placed an "R" in a circle on first editions and removed from subsequent printings (subsequent printings not otherwise noted).
St. Martin's Press. Until the early 1980s, no first-edition statement, but subsequent printings noted. Since the early 1980s, have used a number row and a first-edition statement.
Scribners. Until 1930, the Scribners seal and the date of publication (month and year) generally appeared on first editions, and subsequent printings were usually noted (although did not strictly adhered to either practice). Since 1930, have used an "A" on the copyright page to denote the first edition, sometimes with the Scribner seal, and sometimes with a code representing the month and year of publication and the book's manufacturer (later printings were either not noted, or indicated with a "B," etc.). In the 1970s, added a number row, which includes a letter code for the manufacturer and type of binding (at the center).
Martin Secker, Ltd. / Secker & Warburg. Prior to the 1940s, no statement on first editions or occasionally stated "First Published in ...(Year)"; subsequent printings noted. In the 1940s, began stating "First published in ...(Year)" on the copyright page of first editions; continued noting subsequent printings.
Simon & Schuster. Until 1952, no statement on first editions, but subsequent printings noted (possibly with symbols as, reportedly, a few titles in the 1930s carried a series of dots or asterisks on the copyright page to indicate additional printings). In 1952, began using a first-edition statement. In the early 1970s, began using a number row (occasionally with a first edition statement).
William Sloane Associates. States "First Printing" on the copyright page of first editions, and notes subsequent printings.
Small, Maynard. No statement on the first edition.
Smith, Elder. No statement on the first edition.
Harrison Smith & Robert Haas. Not consistent in use of a first-edition statement, but subsequent printings noted.
Stanton & Lee. See Arkham House.
Frederick A. Stokes Co. No statement on first editions, but subsequent printings noted.
Sun Dial. Reprint publisher.

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